End of Life Plan Form Request

Complete the form below and click “Email me my form” to receive your FREE copy of the End of Life Plan Form.

We will send you an email to confirm that you do wish to receive it.
Simply click the link in the email to confirm your request.

Once you have confirmed you will receive a second email with the link to download the form.

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This plan has got to be a must for both young and old and it’s a “non-invasive” way to bring up a topic that is often shunned by many people. Whilst it’s a very personal thing, it does allow for a person to do it themselves, or if they wish, they can do it with someone they trust etc. 

The layout and content of the plan really exudes a feeling of “respect, compassion and caring”.

Todd Turner-Sow

New South Wales

End of Life Plan Form

My Dad did not want us to contact one of his relatives until after his funeral to let this person know that he was dying and had actually died.  Dad died in a hospice, where he’d been for about a month, with our family gathered around him.  It was actually beautifully peaceful and we all knew his last breath as he took it.

My Sister wanted to go out alone and be in her own home.  It was not that she was not loved and did not love us, she just wanted to take this last step on her earthly journey alone.  And that was what she did.  She died in her home with only her carer.

My Mum didn’t have a huge appetite in her last couple of weeks, which is pretty common.  However, we did find the most divine vanilla slice which gave her so much pleasure to eat.  I even took it into the hospice.

In all of these cases, we knew what these people intended for their end journeys and as much as possible we were able to fulfill those wishes.  They all died what we would call a ‘ good death’ – as they defined it themselves.

Then of course, we have all heard the horror stories of families divided…
Jennifer Gable was a 32 year old transgender woman who died suddenly.  She had legally changed her name and wholly identified herself as a woman.  However, at her funeral, her open casket featured her presented as a man with her hair cut short and in a man’s suit.

Another story that was shared with me…
An elderly lady belonged to a particular religion that did not allow her to talk to those who have chosen to leave the religion.  She had a number of children who had left, but she had one son who was very active within their religion.  When she was in a nursing home and dying, she wished to see her children and grandchildren to say her goodbyes.  The son made sure that the other family members knew that they were not welcome.

 

Our end journey should be based on our choices.  It is a truly sacred time that can provide so many gifts and healings, when we do it right, as defined by ourselves as individuals.  It can also go a long way to easing the grieving process for loved ones that remain.

That’s why everyone needs to complete this form.  Of course, it is just an intent and there is nothing legally binding, but if you don’t have your wishes documented, how can they be honoured?  You don’t need to be over 18 years, just in a position to consider what’s important to you through the experience. This form covers the following :

  • Where you want to be
  • What you want around you
  • What alternate/complementary therapies you might want
  • Who you do and don’t want present
  • Your religious/spiritual beliefs
  • Your definition of ‘Good Death’
  • Whether you wish to have a Pre-Wake
  • What some of your favourite musicians/flowers/foods/movies are
  • What ceremonies/rituals you wish to be undertaken
  • If you wish to donate your organs
  • What you wish to be done with your physical remains
  • What celebrations of your life you wish

It is a comprehensive form, but it is not overwhelming.  It has been written so that it is easy to use, clear and able to capture your wishes easily.